Network port(s) running in low speed-f5-all

Network port(s) running in low speed-f5-all
0

Network port(s) running in low speed-f5-all

Vendor: f5

OS: all

Description:
Indeni will alert one or more network ports is running in a speed lower than 1000Mbps.

Remediation Steps:
Many times ports are in a low speed due to an autonegotation error or a misconfiguration.

How does this work?
This alert logs into the F5 unit through the iControl REST API and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the actual runtime speed of each interface.

Why is this important?
Generally, these days network interfaces are set at 1Gbps or more. Sometimes, due to a configuration or device issue, an interface can be set below that (to 100mbps or even 10mbps). As that is usually not the intended behavior, it is important to track the speed of all network interfaces.

Without Indeni how would you find this?
An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces to see the speed of each interface by looking at the column “Media Speed”. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command “show net interface all-properties” and looking at the column “Media”. The numbers are the value of the speed in “MegaBits”. Example: 1000T-FD means “1000 Mbit”.

f5-rest-net-interface-stats

name: f5-rest-net-interface-stats
description: Determine network interface metrics
type: monitoring
monitoring_interval: 1 minute
requires:
    vendor: f5
    product: load-balancer
    rest-api: 'true'
comments:
    network-interface-state:
        why: |
            Interfaces in the "down" state could result in downtime or reduced redundancy.
        how: |
            The state of the interface is retrieved via the F5 iControl REST API.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces to see the status of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-admin-state:
        why: |
            An administrator might set a network interface to be disabled for troubleshooting, but. Should he he forget about doing this network trunks might be running at reduced capacity.
        how: |
            This alert uses the F5 iControl REST API to retrieve the status of all physical network interfaces. In that output, it looks for interfaces that are set to be up, but are actually down.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces to see the admin status of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-mac:
        why: |
            To be able to search for MAC addresses in indeni, this data needs to be stored.
        how: |
            This alert uses the F5 iControl REST API to retrieve the MAC addresses of all physical network interfaces.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces to see the mac address of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-mtu:
        why: |
            The MTU sometimes needs to be adjusted. Storing this gives an administrator an easy way to view the MTU from a large number of devices, as well as identifying incorrectly set MTU.
        how: |
            This alert uses the F5 iControl REST API to retrieve the MTU from all physical interfaces.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could log into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties" to see the MTU for each interface.
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-rx-packets:
        why: |
            Tracking the number of packets flowing through each network interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
        how: |
            This alert logs into the F5 unit through the F5 iControl REST API and retrieves the metrics from all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of packets received through the interface.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces -> Statistics to see the statistics of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-tx-packets:
        why: |
            Tracking the number of packets flowing through each VLAN interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
        how: |
            This alert logs into the F5 unit through the F5 iControl REST API and retrieves the metrics from all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of packets transmitted through the interface.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces -> Statistics to see the statistics of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-rx-dropped:
        why: |
            If incoming packets are being dropped on a network interface, it is important to be aware of it. This may be due to a high load on the unit, or another capacity issue.
        how: |
            This alert logs into the F5 unit through the F5 iControl REST API and retrieves the metrics from all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of packets dropped on an interface.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces -> Statistics to see the statistics of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: true
    network-interface-tx-dropped:
        why: |
            If outgoing packets are being dropped on a network interface, it is important to be aware of it. This may be due to a high load on the unit, or another capacity issue.
        how: |
            This alert logs into the F5 unit through the F5 iControl REST API and retrieves the metrics from all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of packets dropped on an interface.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces -> Statistics to see the statistics of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-rx-bytes:
        why: |
            Tracking the amount of data flowing through each network interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
        how: |
            This alert logs into the F5 unit through the F5 iControl REST API and retrieves the metrics from all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of bytes received through the interface.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces -> Statistics to see the statistics of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-tx-bytes:
        why: |
            Tracking the amount of data flowing through each network interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
        how: |
            This alert logs into the F5 unit through the F5 iControl REST API and retrieves the metrics from all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of bytes transmitted through the interface.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces -> Statistics to see the statistics of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-tx-errors:
        why: |
            Transmit errors on an interface could indicate a problem.
        how: |
            This alert logs into the F5 unit through the F5 iControl REST API and retrieves the metrics from all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of transmit errors on each interface.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces -> Statistics to see the statistics of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-rx-errors:
        why: |
            Receive errors on an interface could indicate a problem.
        how: |
            This alert logs into the F5 unit through the F5 iControl REST API and retrieves the metrics from all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of receive errors on each interface.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces -> Statistics to see the statistics of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-speed:
        why: |
            Generally, these days network interfaces are set at 1Gbps or more. Sometimes, due to a configuration or device issue, an interface can be set below that (to 100mbps or even 10mbps). As that is usually _not_ the intended behavior, it is important to track the speed of all network interfaces.
        how: |
            This alert logs into the F5 unit through the iControl REST API and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the actual runtime speed of each interface.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces to see the speed of each interface by looking at the column "Media Speed". This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties" and looking at the column "Media". The numbers are the value of the speed in "MegaBits". Example: 1000T-FD means "1000 Mbit".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-duplex:
        why: |
            Generally, these days network interfaces are set at full duplex. Sometimes, due to a configuration or device issue, an interface can be set to half duplex. As that is usually _not_ the intended behavior, it is important to track the duplex setting of all network interfaces.
        how: |
            This alert logs into the F5 unit through the iControl REST API and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the actual runtime duplex of each interface.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces and click on each interface in the list to see the duplex of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties" and looking at the column "Media". A value of "FD" means "Full Duplex", while a value of "HD" means "Half Duplex". Example: 1000T-FD means "Speed: 1000 Mbit, Duplex: Full, Media Type: Copper Twister Pair".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
    network-interface-type:
        why: |
            The type of interface can be useful for administrators.
        how: |
            This alert logs into the F5 unit through the iControl REST API and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the actual runtime duplex of each interface.
        without-indeni: |
            An administrator could login to the web interface of the device and go to Network -> Interfaces and click on each interface in the list to see the media type of each interface. This information is also available by logging into the device through SSH, entering TMSH and executing the command "show net interface all-properties" and looking at the column "Media". Example: "1000T-FD" means "Speed: 1000 Mbit, Duplex: Full, Media Type: Copper Twister Pair".
        can-with-snmp: true
        can-with-syslog: false
steps:
-   run:
        type: HTTP
        command: /mgmt/tm/net/interface/stats?options=all-properties&$select=tmName,status,macAddress,mtu,counters.bitsIn,counters.bitsOut,counters.pktsIn,counters.pktsOut,counters.dropsIn,counters.dropsOut,counters.errorsIn,counters.errorsOut,mediaActive
    parse:
        type: JSON
        file: rest-mgmt-tm-net-interface.parser.1.json.yaml

cross_vendor_network_port_speed_low

// Deprecation warning : Scala template-based rules are deprecated. Please use YAML format rules instead.

package com.indeni.server.rules.library.templatebased.crossvendor

import com.indeni.ruleengine.expressions.Expression
import com.indeni.ruleengine.expressions.conditions.{Equals => RuleEquals, Or => RuleOr}
import com.indeni.ruleengine.expressions.data.SnapshotExpression
import com.indeni.server.rules.library.RuleHelper.networkInterfaceAdminState
import com.indeni.server.rules.{RemediationStepCondition, RuleCategory, RuleContext}
import com.indeni.server.rules.library.templates.SingleSnapshotValueCheckTemplateRule
import com.indeni.server.rules.library.RuleHelper

/**
  *
  */
case class cross_vendor_network_port_speed_low() extends SingleSnapshotValueCheckTemplateRule(
  ruleName = "cross_vendor_network_port_speed_low",
  ruleFriendlyName = "All Devices: Network port(s) running in low speed",
  ruleDescription = "Indeni will alert one or more network ports is running in a speed lower than 1000Mbps.",
  ruleCategories = Set(RuleCategory.HealthChecks),
  metricName = "network-interface-speed",
  applicableMetricTag = "name",
  alertAlternativeMetricTag = Some("alert-item-port-speed"),
  alertItemsHeader = "Ports Affected",
  alertDescription = "One or more ports are set to a speed lower than 1000Mbps. This is usually an error. Review the list of ports below.",
  baseRemediationText = "Many times ports are in a low speed due to an autonegotation error or a misconfiguration.",
  complexCondition = RuleOr(
    RuleEquals(SnapshotExpression("network-interface-speed").asSingle().mostRecent().value().noneable,
      RuleHelper.createComplexStringConstantExpression("10M")),
    RuleEquals(SnapshotExpression("network-interface-speed").asSingle().mostRecent().value().noneable,
      RuleHelper.createComplexStringConstantExpression("100M"))
  ),
  secondaryCondition = c => networkInterfaceAdminState(c.tsDao, expected = 1.0),
  alertItemHeadlineExpersion = new Expression[String] {
    val networkInterfaceSpeedExpersion = SnapshotExpression("network-interface-speed").asSingle().mostRecent()
    override def eval(time: Long): String = networkInterfaceSpeedExpersion.eval(time).value.getOrElse("value", "")
    override def args: Set[Expression[_]] = Set(networkInterfaceSpeedExpersion)
  },
  headlineFormat = "%s set has a %s"
)(
  RemediationStepCondition.VENDOR_CISCO ->
    """|
       |1. Use the "show interface" NX-OS command to display speed and duplex settings of an interface.
       |2. Use the "show interface status" and "show interface capabilities" NX-OS commands to gather more information about ports.
       |3. You can disable link negotiation using the "no negotiate auto" command. Use the "negotiate auto" command to enable auto negotiation on 1-Gigabit ports when the connected peer does not support auto negotiation. By default, auto-negotiation is enabled on 1-Gigabit ports and disabled on 10-Gigabit ports.
       |4. Cisco does not recommend to enable auto negotiation on 10-Gigabit ports. Enabling auto-negotiation on 10-Gigabit ports brings the link down. By default, link negotiation is disabled on 10-Gigabit ports.
       |NOTE: A shut and no shut to the interface may be required after the aforementioned configuration change.""".stripMargin
)