Network port(s) down-paloaltonetworks-panos

health-checks
critical
panos
paloaltonetworks
Network port(s) down-paloaltonetworks-panos
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Network port(s) down-paloaltonetworks-panos

Vendor: paloaltonetworks

OS: panos

Description:
Indeni will trigger an issue if one or more network ports is down.

Remediation Steps:
Review the cause for the ports being down.

How does this work?
This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for interfaces that are set to be up, but are actually down.

Why is this important?
If a network interface is set to be up (what’s known as “admin up”) but is actually down (a cable is not connected, the device on the other side is down, etc.) it is important to know.

Without Indeni how would you find this?
An administrator would normally use SNMP or write a script to poll the status and details of network interfaces and alert accordingly.

panos-show-interface

#! META
name: panos-show-interface
description: Fetch interface information and stats
type: monitoring
monitoring_interval: 5 minute
requires:
    vendor: paloaltonetworks
    os.name: panos
    product: firewall

#! COMMENTS
network-interface-admin-state:
    why: |
        If a network interface is set to be up (what's known as "admin up") but is actually down (a cable is not connected, the device on the other side is down, etc.) it is important to know.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for interfaces that are set to be up, but are actually down.
    without-indeni: |
        An administrator would normally use SNMP or write a script to poll the status and details of network interfaces and alert accordingly.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-speed:
    why: |
        Generally, these days network interfaces are set at 1Gbps or more. Sometimes, due to a configuration or device issue, an interface can be set below that (to 100mbps or even 10mbps). As that is usually _not_ the intended behavior, it is important to track the speed of all network interfaces.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the actual runtime speed of each interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The status of network interfaces is visible through the web interface. If a configured interface is down, it will appear with a red indicator.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-bandwidth-mbps:
    why: |
        This is similar to network-interface-speed but returns double value for alerting purpose.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the actual runtime speed of each interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The status of network interfaces is visible through the web interface. If a configured interface is down, it will appear with a red indicator.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-duplex:
    why: |
        Generally, these days network interfaces are set at full duplex. Sometimes, due to a configuration or device issue, an interface can be set to half duplex. As that is usually _not_ the intended behavior, it is important to track the duplex setting of all network interfaces.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the actual runtime duplex of each interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The duplex setting of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-tx-packets:
    why: |
        Tracking the number of packets flowing through each network interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of packets transmitted through the interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The traffic statistics of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-tx-bytes:
    why: |
        Tracking the amount of data flowing through each network interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of bytes transmitted through the interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The traffic statistics of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-rx-packets:
    why: |
        Tracking the number of packets flowing through each network interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of packets received through the interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The traffic statistics of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-rx-bytes:
    why: |
        Tracking the amount of data flowing through each network interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of bytes received through the interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The traffic statistics of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-rx-dropped:
    why: |
        If incoming packets are being dropped on a network interface, it is important to be aware of it. This may be due to a high load on the firewall, or another capacity issue.
    how: |
        This script logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of packets dropped on an interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The traffic statistics of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-state:
    why: |
        If a network interface is set to be up (what's known as "admin up") but is actually down (a cable is not connected, the device on the other side is down, etc.) it is important to know.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for interfaces that are set to be up, but are actually down.
    without-indeni: |
        An administrator would normally use SNMP or write a script to poll the status and details of network interfaces and alert accordingly.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-mtu:
    why: |
        The MTU of an interface may be inadvertently set to a low value. It's important to know if this happens and fix it.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it retrieves the MTU values.
    without-indeni: |
        Alerting on low MTU values normally requires scripting to be done by the administrator.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-mac:
    skip-documentation: true
network-interface-rx-errors:
    skip-documentation: true
network-interfaces:
    skip-documentation: true

#! REMOTE::HTTP
url: /api?type=op&cmd=<show><interface>all</interface></show>&key=${api-key}
protocol: HTTPS

#! PARSER::XML
_vars:
    root: /response/result
_dynamic_vars:
    _dynamic:
        nic:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/entry[contains(name, '/')]/name"

#! REMOTE::HTTP
url: /api?type=op&cmd=<show><interface>${nic}</interface></show>&key=${api-key}
protocol: HTTPS

#! PARSER::XML
_vars:
    root: /response/result
_metrics:
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-state"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface state"
            "im.dstype.displayType":
                _constant: "state"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _temp:
            "state":
                _text: "${root}/hw/state"
        _transform:
            _value.double: |
                {
                    if (temp("state") == "up") {
                        print "1"
                    } else {
                        print "0"
                    }
                }
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-admin-state"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface admin states"
            "im.dstype.displayType":
                _constant: "state"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _temp:
            "state_c":
                _text: "${root}/hw/state_c"
        _transform:
            _value.double: |
                {
                    if (temp("state_c") == "up" || temp("state_c") == "auto") {
                        print "1"
                    } else {
                        print "0"
                    }
                }
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-duplex"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface duplex settings"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _value.complex:
            value:
                _text: "${root}/hw[not(duplex = 'unknown')]/duplex"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-speed"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface speeds"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _temp:
            "speed":
                _text: ${root}/hw[not(speed = 'unknown')]/speed
        _transform:
            _value.complex:
                value: |
                    {
                        print temp("speed") "M"
                    }
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-bandwidth-mbps"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
        _transform:
            _tags:
                "name": |
                    {
                        print dynamic("nic")
                    }
        _value.double:
            _text: ${root}/hw[not(speed = 'unknown')]/speed
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-mtu"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface MTU settings"
            "im.dstype.displayType":
                _constant: "number"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _value.complex:
            value:
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/mtu"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-mac"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface mac addresses"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _value.complex:
            value:
                _text: "${root}/hw/mac"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-tx-bytes"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/obytes"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-rx-bytes"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/ibytes"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-tx-packets"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/opackets"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-rx-packets"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/ipackets"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-rx-errors"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface RX errors"
            "im.dstype.displayType":
                _constant: "number"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/ierrors"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-rx-dropped"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface rx dropped"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
            "im.dstype.displayType":
                _constant: "number"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/idrops"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interfaces"
        _value.complex:
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
        _value: complex-array

panos-show-interface

#! META
name: panos-show-interface
description: Fetch interface information and stats
type: monitoring
monitoring_interval: 5 minute
requires:
    vendor: paloaltonetworks
    os.name: panos
    product: firewall

#! COMMENTS
network-interface-admin-state:
    why: |
        If a network interface is set to be up (what's known as "admin up") but is actually down (a cable is not connected, the device on the other side is down, etc.) it is important to know.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for interfaces that are set to be up, but are actually down.
    without-indeni: |
        An administrator would normally use SNMP or write a script to poll the status and details of network interfaces and alert accordingly.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-speed:
    why: |
        Generally, these days network interfaces are set at 1Gbps or more. Sometimes, due to a configuration or device issue, an interface can be set below that (to 100mbps or even 10mbps). As that is usually _not_ the intended behavior, it is important to track the speed of all network interfaces.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the actual runtime speed of each interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The status of network interfaces is visible through the web interface. If a configured interface is down, it will appear with a red indicator.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-bandwidth-mbps:
    why: |
        This is similar to network-interface-speed but returns double value for alerting purpose.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the actual runtime speed of each interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The status of network interfaces is visible through the web interface. If a configured interface is down, it will appear with a red indicator.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-duplex:
    why: |
        Generally, these days network interfaces are set at full duplex. Sometimes, due to a configuration or device issue, an interface can be set to half duplex. As that is usually _not_ the intended behavior, it is important to track the duplex setting of all network interfaces.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the actual runtime duplex of each interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The duplex setting of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-tx-packets:
    why: |
        Tracking the number of packets flowing through each network interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of packets transmitted through the interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The traffic statistics of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-tx-bytes:
    why: |
        Tracking the amount of data flowing through each network interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of bytes transmitted through the interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The traffic statistics of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-rx-packets:
    why: |
        Tracking the number of packets flowing through each network interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of packets received through the interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The traffic statistics of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-rx-bytes:
    why: |
        Tracking the amount of data flowing through each network interface is important to identify potential issues, spikes in traffic, etc.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of bytes received through the interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The traffic statistics of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-rx-dropped:
    why: |
        If incoming packets are being dropped on a network interface, it is important to be aware of it. This may be due to a high load on the firewall, or another capacity issue.
    how: |
        This script logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for the number of packets dropped on an interface.
    without-indeni: |
        The traffic statistics of network interfaces can be manually reviewed through the CLI.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-state:
    why: |
        If a network interface is set to be up (what's known as "admin up") but is actually down (a cable is not connected, the device on the other side is down, etc.) it is important to know.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it looks for interfaces that are set to be up, but are actually down.
    without-indeni: |
        An administrator would normally use SNMP or write a script to poll the status and details of network interfaces and alert accordingly.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-mtu:
    why: |
        The MTU of an interface may be inadvertently set to a low value. It's important to know if this happens and fix it.
    how: |
        This alert logs into the Palo Alto Networks firewall through SSH and retrieves the status of all network interfaces. In that output, it retrieves the MTU values.
    without-indeni: |
        Alerting on low MTU values normally requires scripting to be done by the administrator.
    can-with-snmp: true
    can-with-syslog: true
network-interface-mac:
    skip-documentation: true
network-interface-rx-errors:
    skip-documentation: true
network-interfaces:
    skip-documentation: true

#! REMOTE::HTTP
url: /api?type=op&cmd=<show><interface>all</interface></show>&key=${api-key}
protocol: HTTPS

#! PARSER::XML
_vars:
    root: /response/result
_dynamic_vars:
    _dynamic:
        nic:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/entry[contains(name, '/')]/name"

#! REMOTE::HTTP
url: /api?type=op&cmd=<show><interface>${nic}</interface></show>&key=${api-key}
protocol: HTTPS

#! PARSER::XML
_vars:
    root: /response/result
_metrics:
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-state"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface state"
            "im.dstype.displayType":
                _constant: "state"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _temp:
            "state":
                _text: "${root}/hw/state"
        _transform:
            _value.double: |
                {
                    if (temp("state") == "up") {
                        print "1"
                    } else {
                        print "0"
                    }
                }
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-admin-state"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface admin states"
            "im.dstype.displayType":
                _constant: "state"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _temp:
            "state_c":
                _text: "${root}/hw/state_c"
        _transform:
            _value.double: |
                {
                    if (temp("state_c") == "up" || temp("state_c") == "auto") {
                        print "1"
                    } else {
                        print "0"
                    }
                }
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-duplex"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface duplex settings"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _value.complex:
            value:
                _text: "${root}/hw[not(duplex = 'unknown')]/duplex"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-speed"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface speeds"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _temp:
            "speed":
                _text: ${root}/hw[not(speed = 'unknown')]/speed
        _transform:
            _value.complex:
                value: |
                    {
                        print temp("speed") "M"
                    }
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-bandwidth-mbps"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
        _transform:
            _tags:
                "name": |
                    {
                        print dynamic("nic")
                    }
        _value.double:
            _text: ${root}/hw[not(speed = 'unknown')]/speed
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-mtu"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface MTU settings"
            "im.dstype.displayType":
                _constant: "number"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _value.complex:
            value:
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/mtu"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-mac"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface mac addresses"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _value.complex:
            value:
                _text: "${root}/hw/mac"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-tx-bytes"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/obytes"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-rx-bytes"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/ibytes"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-tx-packets"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/opackets"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-rx-packets"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/ipackets"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-rx-errors"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface RX errors"
            "im.dstype.displayType":
                _constant: "number"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/ierrors"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interface-rx-dropped"
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
            "live-config":
                _constant: "true"
            "display-name":
                _constant: "Interface rx dropped"
            "im.dsType":
                _constant: "counter"
            "im.dstype.displayType":
                _constant: "number"
            "im.identity-tags":
                _constant: "name"
        _value.double:
            _text: "${root}/ifnet/counters/hw/entry/idrops"
    -
        _tags:
            "im.name":
                _constant: "network-interfaces"
        _value.complex:
            "name":
                _text: "${root}/ifnet/name"
        _value: complex-array

cross_vendor_network_port_down

package com.indeni.server.rules.library

import com.indeni.ruleengine.expressions.conditions.{And, Equals}
import com.indeni.ruleengine.expressions.core.{StatusTreeExpression, _}
import com.indeni.ruleengine.expressions.data.{SelectTagsExpression, SelectTimeSeriesExpression, TimeSeriesExpression}
import com.indeni.server.common.data.conditions.True
import com.indeni.server.rules._
import com.indeni.server.rules.library.core.PerDeviceRule
import com.indeni.server.sensor.models.managementprocess.alerts.dto.AlertSeverity


case class PortIsDownRule() extends PerDeviceRule with RuleHelper {

  override val metadata: RuleMetadata = RuleMetadata.builder("cross_vendor_network_port_down", "All Devices: Network port(s) down",
    "Indeni will trigger an issue if one or more network ports is down.", AlertSeverity.CRITICAL).build()

  override def expressionTree(context: RuleContext): StatusTreeExpression = {

    val actualValue = TimeSeriesExpression[Double]("network-interface-state").last
    val adminValue = TimeSeriesExpression[Double]("network-interface-admin-state").last

    StatusTreeExpression(
      // Which objects to pull (normally, devices)
      SelectTagsExpression(context.metaDao, Set(DeviceKey), True),

      // What constitutes an issue
      And(StatusTreeExpression(
        // The additional tags we care about (we'll be including this in alert data)
        SelectTagsExpression(context.tsDao, Set("name"), withTagsCondition("network-interface-state")),
        And(
          StatusTreeExpression(
            SelectTimeSeriesExpression[Double](context.tsDao, Set("network-interface-state"), denseOnly = false),
            Equals(ConstantExpression[Option[Double]](Some(0)), actualValue)
          ).withoutInfo().asCondition(),
          StatusTreeExpression(
            SelectTimeSeriesExpression[Double](context.tsDao, Set("network-interface-admin-state"), denseOnly = false),
            adminValue.isNot(0.0)
          ).withoutInfo().asCondition().orElse(Some(true))
        )
      ).withSecondaryInfo(
        scopableStringFormatExpression("${scope(\"name\")}"),
        EMPTY_STRING,
        title = "Ports Affected"
      ).asCondition(), generateDevicePassiveAndPassiveLinkStateCondition(context.tsDao))
    ).withRootInfo(
      getHeadline(),
      ConstantExpression("One or more ports are down."),
      ConditionalRemediationSteps("Review the cause for the ports being down.",
        ConditionalRemediationSteps.OS_NXOS ->
          """|
            |1. Check the physical media to ensure that there are no damaged parts.
            |2. Verify that the SFP (small form-factor pluggable) devices in use are those authorized by Cisco and that they are not faulty by executing the "show interface transceiver" NX-OS command.
            |3. Verify that you have enabled the port by using the "no shutdown" NX-OS command.
            |4. Use the "show interface" command to verify the state of the interface. Besides, you can use the "show interface counters" command to check port counters.
            |5. Check if the port is configured in dedicated mode.
            |6. Execute the following NX-OS commands to gather more information about ports:
            | a. "show interface status"
            | b. "show interface capabilities"
            | c. "show udld"
            | d. "show tech-support udld"
            |
            |7. For more information review: <a target="_blank" href="https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/switches/datacenter/nexus9000/sw/7-x/troubleshooting/guide/b_Cisco_Nexus_9000_Series_NX-OS_Troubleshooting_Guide_7x/b_Cisco_Nexus_9000_Series_NX-OS_Troubleshooting_Guide_7x_chapter_0101.pdf">Nexus Troubleshooting Guide</a> """.stripMargin,
        ConditionalRemediationSteps.VENDOR_JUNIPER ->
          """|
            |1. On the device command line interface run "show interfaces extensive" command to check the status of the interface.
            |2. Execute "show configuration interface" command to check interface configuration.
            |3. Check the encapsulation type and physical media on the port.
            |4. Check the port specification and the fiber cable.
            |5. Review the following article on Juniper TechLibrary for more information: <a target="_blank" href="https://www.juniper.net/documentation/en_US/junos/topics/reference/command-summary/show-interfaces-security.html#jd0e1772">Operational Commands: show interfaces (SRX Series)</a>.""".stripMargin,
        ConditionalRemediationSteps.VENDOR_FORTINET ->
          """|
            |1. Monitor hardware network operations (e.g. speed, duplex settings) by using the "diag hardware deviceinfo nic <interface>" FortiOS command.
            |2. Run the command "diag hardware deviceinfo nic <interface>" command to display a list of hardware related names and values. Review the next link for more details: http://help.fortinet.com/fos50hlp/54/Content/FortiOS/fortigate-toubleshooting-54/troubleshooting_tools.htm
            |3. Run the hidden FortiOS command "fnsysctl cat /proc/net/dev" to get a summary of  the interface statistics.
            |4. Check for a mismatch in the speed and duplex interface settings on two sides of a cable, or for a damaged cable / SFP. Try to manually configure both sides to the same speed/duplex mode when you can. For more information, review "Symptoms of Ethernet speed/duplex mismatches" at http://kb.fortinet.com/kb/documentLink.do?externalID=10653
            |5. Review the log history for interfaces status changes.
            |6. Review the interface configuration. For more information, use the following interface configuration guide: http://help.fortinet.com/fos50hlp/52data/Content/FortiOS/fortigate-system-administration-52/Interfaces/interfaces.htm""".stripMargin
      )
    )
  }
}





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